Why Study in Greece

Greece

Capital Athens
Government Unitary Parliamentary Republic
Currency Euro =  €(EUR)
Area total: 131,957 km2
Population 10,768,477( 2017 estimate)
Language Greek
Religion Eastern Orthodoxy

Places to Visit in Greece

Athens

Inhabited for more than 3,000 years, Athens is widely known as the cradle of Western civilization and the birthplace of democracy. The city presents a confusing blend of historical and modern features. Athens is famous for its archaeological ruins and monuments such as the famous Acropolis, the Parthenon, the Ancient Agora and the Theatre of Dionysos just to name a few. However, Athens is not just about ancient ruins. This bustling city is also an important center for business, culture and nightlife.

Delphi

Second to the Acropolis in Athens, Delphi is Greece’s most popular archaeological site. Located about two and half hours from Athens along the slopes of the awe-inspiring Mount Parnassus, Delphi was once revered by the ancient Greeks as the center of the earth. Dedicated to the god, Apollo, Delphi was an important oracle. In ancient times, people would come to this sacred spot to inquire of the priestess for advice on a wide range of topics from farming to relationships and politics. Significant ruins and structures at Delphi include the Temple of Apollo, the Athenian Treasury, the theater and hippodrome that once hosted events of the ancient Pythian Games.

Delphi

Second to the Acropolis in Athens, Delphi is Greece’s most popular archaeological site. Located about two and half hours from Athens along the slopes of the awe-inspiring Mount Parnassus, Delphi was once revered by the ancient Greeks as the center of the earth. Dedicated to the god, Apollo, Delphi was an important oracle. In ancient times, people would come to this sacred spot to inquire of the priestess for advice on a wide range of topics from farming to relationships and politics. Significant ruins and structures at Delphi include the Temple of Apollo, the Athenian Treasury, the theater and hippodrome that once hosted events of the ancient Pythian Games.

Crete

The largest of the Greek islands, Crete is a spacious land of pleasing contrasts where landscapes range from stunning coastline to rugged mountains and rolling countryside dotted with olive trees. Bustling metropolitan cities spread beyond to quiet villages centered around outdoor coffee shops. Steeped in history, Crete still bears archaeological traces of the many civilizations that inhabited it down through the centuries.

Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki is Greece’s second-largest city and the capital city of the Macedonian region of Northern Greece. Lively festivals, social events and a buzzing nightlife make this city the cultural capital of Greece. Comprised of a historic city center and commercial district, Thessaloniki offers both old and new attractions from its Byzantine walls, White Tower and Turkish baths to colorful food markets, museums and art galleries. Thessaloniki’s nightlife is unmatched. From small tavernas to nightclubs and other entertainment venues, Thessaloniki offers it all

Santorini

Santorini is one of the Cyclades islands in the Aegean Sea. It was devastated by a volcanic eruption in the 16th century BC, forever shaping its rugged landscape. The whitewashed, cubiform houses of its 2 principal towns, Fira and Oia, cling to cliffs above an underwater caldera (crater). They overlook the sea, small islands to the west and beaches made up of black, red and white lava pebbles.

Living in Athens

Airport

The new Athens Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport 27 km (17 miles) east of the city center,  near the suburb of Spáta. The airport has excellent public transit connections to the city (see below) and the usual array of food stands, duty-free shops, and other airport services.There is a Tourist information station in Arrivals that will have the latest literature put out by the Tourist Information Department; this is useful for getting information.You are going to need euro coins if you want a trolley for your luggage; trolleys are available at the airport, you will find them in the baggage hall on arrival and they use coins the same way supermarket trolleys do. You insert your coin, and you get it back by placing the trolley back to its original position.

Coaches (KTEL)

Coaches (KTEL) connect Athens to other cities in Greece. The fleet of buses has recently been upgraded, which makes the journey pleasant and safe. For some destinations one can also use the buses of the railroad company (OSE, see next paragraph) that might be international, but can also be used for in-country transport.

Athens Metro

The Athens Metro is more commonly known in Greece as the Attiko Metro (Greek: Αττικό Mετρό) and provides public transport throughout the Athens Urban Area. While its main purpose is transport, it also houses Greek artifacts found during construction of the system. The Athens Metro has an operating staff of 387 and runs two of the three metro lines; namely the Red (line 2) and Blue (line 3) lines, which were constructed largely during the 1990s, with the initial sections opened in January 2000. All routes run entirely underground and a fleet of 42 trains consisting of 252 cars operate within the network,with a daily occupancy of 550,000 passengers

Tram

Athens Tram SA operates a fleet of 35 vehicles  called ‘AnsaldobredaSirio’, which serve 48 stations,employ 345 people with an average daily occupancy of 65,000 passengers.The tram network spans a total length of 27 km (17 mi) and covers ten Athenian suburbs.The network runs from Syntagma Square to the southwestern suburb of PalaioFaliro, where the line splits in two branches; the first runs along the Athens coastline toward the southern suburb of Voula, while the other heads toward the Piraeusdistrict of Neo Faliro. The network covers the majority of the Saronic coastline. Further extensions are planned towards the major commercial port of Piraeus.The expansion to Piraeus will include 12 new stations, increase the overall length of tram route by 5.4 km (3 mi), and increase the overall transportation network.

Average Living Cost in Athens, Greece

Expense Description Cost
Rent (including utilities)  €(320 – 430)
Meals (eating out liberally)  €(250 – 400)
Internet, DSL, and phone  €                                                                85.00
Local transportation  €                                                                31.00
Entertainment, miscellaneous  €                                                             100.00

Emergency Contacts in Athens, Greece

Police 1033
Fire Emergency 199
Ambulance 166
Tourist Police 171
Airport Police ( +30) 210 3536919
Hospitals, Pharmacies 14944
Road Side Assistance-ELPA 10400
Traffic Police of Athens ( +30) 210 5284000
Emergency 100
Aids Help Line (+30) 210 7222222